Pentagram Papers 43: Drawing McCarthy is a publication by Pentagram that compiles a collection of drawings that depict the Army-McCarthy hearings of 1954.  The series of drawings were made by Pentagram partner Emily Oberman’s mother, Arline Simon, directly from the hearings as they aired on live television in 1954.

Arline Simon noted in the book that “When I began to draw I didn’t realise that I would be drawing history in the making”.

 

Pentagram-PP43_11

 


It’s interesting to consider how the physiognomic commentary made by Arline’s illustrations took place ‘on-location’ in a seemingly different but similar manner.


Sources:
http://www.itsnicethat.com/articles/arline-oberman-pentagram-papers-
http://www.pentagram.com/#/blog/56133

‘Drawing of everyday scenes and situations in an objective way is a very different discipline to the much more dynamic and proactive of drawn visual journalism, which aligns itself more closely to photojournalism and the visual essay. Illustrators in effect work as journalists, interviewing, sketching and photographing their subjects, often composing and interpreting the visual, aural and textural material in a layered interpretive way. Much of the narrative and commentary finds its way to the published artwork through annoyed notes and transcribed conversations.”

Gary Embury editor of reportager.org
Extract from ‘Thoughts from the chair’ Gary Embury, ‘Witness’ reportage and documentary illustration forum, Falmouth university 2014

Oughough

Went to the symposium on Illustration and found this project by Europa interesting and useful for my IPS in terms of the subject and context:

‘A project to think about identity and place of Loughborough. The research for the project became a text and a series of visual responses to the town. Those responses then exist as a set of billboards located in Loughborough and a series of images hosted on the website’ – http://oughough.uk

Oughough

What Makes a Great Children Book

A great book is…

  1. One that contains a simple and original idea presented with clarity and great power.
  2. One that connects with the reader, asserting its world directly into the reader’s mind.
  3. One that makes the world seem larger and more interesting.
  4. One written with humor and a light touch.
  5. One that is a realization of a complete but very different world.

-by Richard Robinson, President and CEO of Scholastic Inc

Source: Abrams, Dennis. (2012). What Makes a Children’s Book Great? We Have Some Answers. Publishing Perspectives. Available from: http://publishingperspectives.com/2012/06/what-makes-a-childrens-book-great-we-have-some-answers/

What Makes a Great Children Book