What Makes a Great Children Book

A great book is…

  1. One that contains a simple and original idea presented with clarity and great power.
  2. One that connects with the reader, asserting its world directly into the reader’s mind.
  3. One that makes the world seem larger and more interesting.
  4. One written with humor and a light touch.
  5. One that is a realization of a complete but very different world.

-by Richard Robinson, President and CEO of Scholastic Inc

Source: Abrams, Dennis. (2012). What Makes a Children’s Book Great? We Have Some Answers. Publishing Perspectives. Available from: http://publishingperspectives.com/2012/06/what-makes-a-childrens-book-great-we-have-some-answers/

What Makes a Great Children Book

A recent campaign by Peta brings into attention the extreme cruelty involved in the fashion industry of exotic skin products. Conceptualised by Oglivy & Mather Advertising Bangkok, a pop-up shop, The Leather Work, was created within Bangkok’s bustling mall. The shop showcased leather goods as per usual but within the interior of these goods, they present the cold hard truth of the cruelty behind this business using snake’s or crocodile’s still-beating heart or an alligator’s intestines that contract and expand in the interiors of the bags or smearing fake blood on consumers when they took off the shoes or gloves upon trying.

The campaign msg in the video was: “For the exotic skins industry, cruelty is a daily business.”

 

Personal Reflection
Personally I think this concept to bring across the cruelty behind the glamorous products was ingenious. As Peta headlined it-“Beauty often blinds people to cruelty”, such a direct confrontation placed within the products itself to the direct consumers has such a strong affect. Those internal organs are ghastly but it is the truth which the consumers were blinded with.

More often than not, I think shock is an important affect and method to bring across statement(s) to people and possibly induce change in us.

In a way, I thought this was really relevant to my previous Unit 5: The Expanded Designer and our current 2060 in the aspect that design has the power and social conscience to influence the society and world.

Constructed Realities

“It’s clear that reality only works for a privileged minority, but designers advocate a realist approach, which means they work within the constraints of reality as it is, for the minority. The school aims to challenge this by making reality a little bit bigger to provide more room for different kinds of dreams and hopes. An important part of this process is generating multiple versions of reality, and this is where design comes in.

“We concluded that the only way to challenge this unsatisfactory situation was to be unrealistic—to breach realism’s heavily policed borders and to fully embrace unreality.”

-Director of The School of Constructed Realities

 

Source: Dunne, Anthony and Raby, Fiona (2014). The School of Constructed Realities. Maharam. Accessed from http://maharam.com/stories/raby_the-school-of-constructed-realities [online] on 27 April 2016.
Constructed Realities

Where do they all come from?

Was searching about loneliness and still thinking about my message behind my zine and came upon this song by The Beatles:

“Eleanor Rigby”

Ah, look at all the lonely people
Ah, look at all the lonely peopleEleanor Rigby picks up the rice in the church where a wedding has been
Lives in a dream
Waits at the window, wearing the face that she keeps in a jar by the door
Who is it for?

All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?

Father McKenzie writing the words of a sermon that no one will hear
No one comes near
Look at him working, darning his socks in the night when there’s nobody there
What does he care?

All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?

Ah, look at all the lonely people
Ah, look at all the lonely people

Eleanor Rigby died in the church and was buried along with her name
Nobody came
Father McKenzie wiping the dirt from his hands as he walks from the grave
No one was saved

All the lonely people (Ah, look at all the lonely people)
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people (Ah, look at all the lonely people)
Where do they all belong?

All the lonely people, where do they all come from?  I like this 2 phrases best; it is open-ended for the audience to think further. It kinds of resonates with what I intended to let my audience realises about the subject being you and that loneliness exists?
Where do they all come from?